Wellington

Wellington: The Path to Victory, 1769-1814

Wellington

Lifeofwellington.co.uk is home to the accompanying Commentary of Rory Muir’s two volume biography of Arthur Wellesley, the Duke of Wellington. The Commentary is the extended text from the first volume of Rory Muir’s definitive biography, Wellington: The Path to Victory, 1769-1814. Originally written by Rory Muir for his own use, Yale University Press is delighted to make it available to read online and as a free download.

 

FightingCancer

Fighting Cancer

FightingCancer

Anyone who is diagnosed with cancer receives a frightening blow, and in many cases the diagnosis is accompanied by a bewildering array of treatment choices. In this invaluable book, Dr. Richard C. Frank offers comfort and help to cancer patients, their families, and their caretakers. Dr. Frank empowers patients by unlocking the mysteries of the disease and explaining in plain language the ways to confront and combat it.

AlbersIoC

Interaction of Color

AlbersIoC

The Interaction of Color mobile app for iPad is packed with elegant and innovative features that help you understand the book’s ideas, view the plates, experiment, and create and share your own designs. This interactive edition of one of the most influential books on color ever written offers users an entirely new way to experience Josef Albers’s original masterwork.

Appgen

The App Generation

Appgen

No one has failed to notice that the current generation of youth is deeply—some would say totally—involved with digital media. Professors Howard Gardner and Katie Davis name today’s young people The App Generation, and in this spellbinding book they explore what it means to be “app-dependent” versus “app-enabled” and how life for this generation differs from life before the digital era.

Gardner and Davis are concerned with three vital areas of adolescent life: identity, intimacy, and imagination. Through innovative research, including interviews of young people, focus groups of those who work with them, and a unique comparison of youthful artistic productions before and after the digital revolution, the authors uncover the drawbacks of apps: they may foreclose a sense of identity, encourage superficial relations with others, and stunt creative imagination. On the other hand, the benefits of apps are equally striking: they can promote a strong sense of identity, allow deep relationships, and stimulate creativity. The challenge is to venture beyond the ways that apps are designed to be used, Gardner and Davis conclude, and they suggest how the power of apps can be a springboard to greater creativity and higher aspirations.