1

On January 9, 2007, Steve Jobs introduced the iPhone to an eager audience crammed into San Francisco’s Moscone Center.1 A beautiful and brilliantly engineered device, the iPhone blended three products into one: an iPod, with the highest-quality screen Apple had ever produced; a phone, with cleverly integrated functionality, such as voicemail that came wrapped as separately accessible messages; and a device to access the Internet, with a smart and elegant browser, and with built-in map, weather, stock, and e-mail capabilities. It was a technical and design triumph for Jobs, bringing the company into a market with an extraordinary potential for growth, and pushing the industry to a new level of competition in ways to connect us to each other and to the Web.


1

This was not the first time Steve Jobs had launched a revolution. Thirty years earlier, at the First West Coast Computer Faire in nearly the same spot, the twenty-one-year-old Jobs, wearing his first suit, exhibited the Apple II personal computer to great buzz amidst “10,000 walking, talking computer freaks.”2 The Apple II was a machine for hobbyists who did not want to fuss with soldering irons: all the ingredients for a functioning PC were provided in a convenient molded plastic case. It looked clunky, yet it could be at home on someone’s desk. Instead of puzzling over bits of hardware or typing up punch cards to feed into someone else’s mainframe, Apple owners faced only the hurdle of a cryptic blinking cursor in the upper left corner of the screen: the PC awaited instructions. But the hurdle was not high. Some owners were inspired to program the machines themselves, but true beginners simply could load up software written and then shared or sold by their more skilled or inspired counterparts. The Apple II was a blank slate, a bold departure from previous technology that had been developed and marketed to perform specific tasks from the first day of its sale to the last day of its use.

The Apple II quickly became popular. And when programmer and entrepreneur Dan Bricklin introduced the first killer application for the Apple II in 1979—VisiCalc, the world’s first spreadsheet program—sales of the ungainly but very cool machine took off dramatically.3 An Apple running VisiCalc helped to convince a skeptical world that there was a place for the PC at everyone’s desk and hence a market to build many, and to build them very fast.

Though these two inventions—iPhone and Apple II—were launched by the same man, the revolutions that they inaugurated are radically different. For the technology that each inaugurated is radically different. The Apple II was quintessentially generative technology. It was a platform. It invited people to tinker with it. Hobbyists wrote programs. Businesses began to plan on selling software. Jobs (and Apple) had no clue how the machine would be used. They had their hunches, but, fortunately for them, nothing constrained the PC to the hunches of the founders. Apple did not even know that VisiCalc was on the market when it noticed sales of the Apple II skyrocketing. The Apple II was designed for surprises—some very good (VisiCalc), and some not so good (the inevitable and frequent computer crashes).


6

The iPhone is the opposite. It is sterile. Rather than a platform that invites innovation, the iPhone comes preprogrammed. You are not allowed to add programs to the all-in-one device that Steve Jobs sells you. Its functionality is locked in, though Apple can change it through remote updates. Indeed, to those who managed to tinker with the code to enable the iPhone to support more or different applications,4 Apple threatened (and then delivered on the threat) to transform the iPhone into an iBrick.5 The machine was not to be generative beyond the innovations that Apple (and its exclusive carrier, AT&T) wanted. Whereas the world would innovate for the Apple II, only Apple would innovate for the iPhone. (A promised software development kit may allow others to program the iPhone with Apple’s permission.)

Jobs was not shy about these restrictions baked into the iPhone. As he said at its launch:


1

We define everything that is on the phone. . . . You don’t want your phone to be like a PC. The last thing you want is to have loaded three apps on your phone and then you go to make a call and it doesn’t work anymore. These are more like iPods than they are like computers.6

No doubt, for a significant number of us, Jobs was exactly right. For in the thirty years between the first flashing cursor on the Apple II and the gorgeous iconized touch menu of the iPhone, we have grown weary not with the unexpected cool stuff that the generative PC had produced, but instead with the unexpected very uncool stuff that came along with it. Viruses, spam, identity theft, crashes: all of these were the consequences of a certain freedom built into the generative PC. As these problems grow worse, for many the promise of security is enough reason to give up that freedom.


1

* * *


1

In the arc from the Apple II to the iPhone, we learn something important about where the Internet has been, and something more important about where it is going. The PC revolution was launched with PCs that invited innovation by others. So too with the Internet. Both were generative: they were designed to accept any contribution that followed a basic set of rules (either coded for a particular operating system, or respecting the protocols of the Internet). Both overwhelmed their respective proprietary, non-generative competitors, such as the makers of stand-alone word processors and proprietary online services like CompuServe and AOL. But the future unfolding right now is very different from this past. The future is not one of generative PCs attached to a generative network. It is instead one of sterile appliances tethered to a network of control.

These appliances take the innovations already created by Internet users and package them neatly and compellingly, which is good—but only if the Internet and PC can remain sufficiently central in the digital ecosystem to compete with locked-down appliances and facilitate the next round of innovations. The balance between the two spheres is precarious, and it is slipping toward the safer appliance. For example, Microsoft’s Xbox 360 video game console is a powerful computer, but, unlike Microsoft’s Windows operating system for PCs, it does not allow just anyone to write software that can run on it. Bill Gates sees the Xbox as at the center of the future digital ecosystem, rather than at its periphery: “It is a general purpose computer. . . . [W]e wouldn’t have done it if it was just a gaming device. We wouldn’t have gotten into the category at all. It was about strategically being in the living room. . . . [T]his is not some big secret. Sony says the same things.”7

It is not easy to imagine the PC going extinct, and taking with it the possibility of allowing outside code to run—code that is the original source of so much of what we find useful about the Internet. But along with the rise of information appliances that package those useful activities without readily allowing new ones, there is the increasing lockdown of the PC itself. PCs may not be competing with information appliances so much as they are becoming them. The trend is starting in schools, libraries, cyber cafés, and offices, where the users of PCs are not their owners. The owners’ interests in maintaining stable computing environments are naturally aligned with technologies that tame the wildness of the Internet and PC, at the expense of valuable activities their users might otherwise discover.


4

The need for stability is growing. Today’s viruses and spyware are not merely annoyances to be ignored as one might tune out loud conversations at nearby tables in a restaurant. They will not be fixed by some new round of patches to bug-filled PC operating systems, or by abandoning now-ubiquitous Windows for Mac. Rather, they pose a fundamental dilemma: as long as people control the code that runs on their machines, they can make mistakes and be tricked into running dangerous code. As more people use PCs and make them more accessible to the outside world through broadband, the value of corrupting these users’ decisions is increasing. That value is derived from stealing people’s attention, PC processing cycles, network bandwidth, or online preferences. And the fact that a Web page can be and often is rendered on the fly by drawing upon hundreds of different sources scattered across the Net—a page may pull in content from its owner, advertisements from a syndicate, and links from various other feeds—means that bad code can infect huge swaths of the Web in a heartbeat.


2

If security problems worsen and fear spreads, rank-and-file users will not be far behind in preferring some form of lockdown—and regulators will speed the process along. In turn, that lockdown opens the door to new forms of regulatory surveillance and control. We have some hints of what that can look like. Enterprising law enforcement officers have been able to eavesdrop on occupants of motor vehicles equipped with the latest travel assistance systems by producing secret warrants and flicking a distant switch. They can turn a standard mobile phone into a roving microphone—whether or not it is being used for a call. As these opportunities arise in places under the rule of law—where some might welcome them—they also arise within technology-embracing authoritarian states, because the technology is exported.

A lockdown on PCs and a corresponding rise of tethered appliances will eliminate what today we take for granted: a world where mainstream technology can be influenced, even revolutionized, out of left field. Stopping this future depends on some wisely developed and implemented locks, along with new technologies and a community ethos that secures the keys to those locks among groups with shared norms and a sense of public purpose, rather than in the hands of a single gatekeeping entity, whether public or private.

The iPhone is a product of both fashion and fear. It boasts an undeniably attractive aesthetic, and it bottles some of the best innovations from the PC and Internet in a stable, controlled form. The PC and Internet were the engines of those innovations, and if they can be saved, they will offer more. As time passes, the brand names on each side will change. But the core battle will remain. It will be fought through information appliances and Web 2.0 platforms like today’s Facebook apps and Google Maps mash-ups. These are not just products but also services, watched and updated according to the constant dictates of their makers and those who can pressure them.

In this book I take up the question of what is likely to come next and what we should do about it.

Posted by The Editors on February 20, 2008
Tags: Uncategorized

Total comments on this page: 187

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Jonathan Zittrain on paragraph 5:

The Apple SDK was announced in March, 2008. As suspected, third party coders for the iPhone are to be licensed, and their software made available only through an Apple iPhone Apps Store. Apple will get a cut of the sales of apps. (App authors can also set the price to zero.) See, e.g., here. This is an example of what I call a “contingently generative technology,” like Facebook Apps, too, even though the iPhone is client-side and Facebook is “in the cloud.”

March 14, 2008 10:06 pm
Tim on paragraph 5:

While Jobs may not have intended for the iPhone to accept outside applications, there are plenty of hackers who decided otherwise. Without a lot of extra trouble, its possible to put all kinds of apps on the phone in its current form. And that’s completely separate from the “jailbreak” schemes to divorce the phone from AT&T (something many of us less geeky types would love to do :-).

April 18, 2008 6:56 am

[…] 3) and CommentPress blogware. Both are about to go head-to-head over Jonathan Zittrain’s book The Future of the Internet–and how to stop it. Zittrain’s book has already been published online with the CommentPress system in place. Now […]

April 28, 2008 1:15 pm

Three times now I’ve started working on reading this and am stuck after only a couple of chapters. Yes, it is interesting, but I’m distracted by too many options. Not only do I need to read from scrolling windows of text, I am sideswiped by two competing annotation products, Diigo and CommentPress.

I’ve been reading text online for almost four decades. But my attention is perpetually being pulled from one place to the other. I have too many opportunities outside of the main text (I can read other people’s notes, I can write my own, I can check my e-mail, and so on). There is no “ludic reading” experience as described by Sven Birkerts.

I wish I had blinders on, as provided by the printed codex book. I can write in the margins without having to be distracted by too many other conversations.

Talmudically inspired study — of a hyped text admittedly carrying intriguing thoughts but ultimately of debatable lasting value — may not be necessary. It is not for everything. It is too self-referential. Are you suggesting that you’re creating a product as important as that of the prophets, which took 1,500 years to produce? We have seen similar overweening efforts to engineer a prophetic buzz — such as Jason Epstein’s (commercially motivated) article The Rattle of Pebbles, and its byproduct, Book Business, to Eric Raymond’s The Cathedral and the Bazaar.

The prophets did not need CommentPress. There was something more humble and monastic there, and it took millennia to evolve. We don’t even really know the names of most of them. Perhaps you should begin on paper.

October 6, 2008 10:45 am
Ben :

So you’re basically faulting the book for your own shortcomings.

July 14, 2010 4:29 pm
steve on paragraph 5:

I’ve been reading that this is less a matter of control for Apple, and even AT&T, but more an issue of how AT&T makes profits. AT&T claims that they cannot afford the number of support calls they would get for a phone running on an open applications platform.

May 5, 2008 3:33 pm
steve pepple on paragraph 14:

I immediately think of an recent British thriller, Surveillance 24/7 that, while it had some plot holes, was interesting and accurate.

May 5, 2008 3:42 pm

This is the IMDB entry for it…

June 25, 2008 3:53 pm
Dave on paragraph 2:

Maybe the Apple II is not the best example since Apple attempted heavy duty control over at least the hardware (squashing clones). A bad example is Texas Instruments, who made the iPhone of the 1980 era with a totally controlled TI-99/4a platform–and failed. However, like the Internet, the IBM PC was the most open hardware and software platform–and this is the platform that skyrocketed similar to the way the Internet has.

May 6, 2008 1:48 pm
Michael on paragraph 5:

Of course, it has been rumored that the apps licensed by Apple will be distributed / sold / managed through iTunes keeping the tethered appliance/network alive and inclusive…of course, you will have to register and provide credit card details and personal information before download and use..

May 15, 2008 11:50 am
Timabee on paragraph 5:

It’s too early to say the iPhone is a sterile device. Like the Apple II, Apple Inc. cannot know where this new technology/packaging of technology will go. They have a road map, but others have ideas of how to use the device. As noted by Tim, hackers are moving the iPhone in other directions, and even the “bricked” comment doesn’t show an understanding of the desire for people to take a tool designed by one entity and make it work for many others. All of this to say that there are ways around or beyond Apple Inc.’s control and plans. None of the hacks and workarounds have hurt Apple’s sales of the device.

May 30, 2008 11:18 pm
Adam on paragraph 9:

What about the deluge of user-generated content on the web today (i.e. widgets, DIY video, facebook applications). Also, what about Facebook open sourcing it’s platform (http://tinyurl.com/57fldr)? I know these events are post hoc, but these developments weren’t out of the blue.

June 8, 2008 5:21 pm
Bob on paragraph 10:

Which is why Linux appliances are so important but even more so is the competitions to create applications.

June 9, 2008 7:22 pm
Martin on paragraph 5:

If iphone 3G is a way to change the rule of the game towards the appliance network, the openmoko project (www.openmoko.org) is the other extreme.

Openmoko strives to build a free and generative mobile network ( at the time of writing google ‘Gphone is still a vapourware.)

But the success depends on the market’s choice.

I am rather optimistic that the generative network can be retained. the PC market defeated the Apple II or Mac appliances. So will the Openmoko defeat iPhone 3G.

July 8, 2008 8:31 am
L. Rogers on paragraph 7:

I agree that security and stability are factors in the drive to standardize and lock down systems; what the introduction glosses over is the more pedestrian motivation that silently buttresses the lock down trend – the old school profit motive. Companies (or investors) tend to prefer the certain profits of a turnpike to the multivalent profit of a highway. I believe that if Apple Computers had been able to foresee the success of the programs that eventually ran on their system, their impulse at the time would have been to control and profit off of these add-ons. Apparently, this is Apple’s impulse now.

So the openness that is, in retrospect, was a very good strategy, was at the time a happy accident. I agree with the author that the benefits of that accident – that an open market creates more value than a closed one, or to put it another way for the rising tide lifts all boats - should have served as a lesson for the iPhone. But is it paranoid for me to speculate that perhaps Apple, and the inventors of other tethered appliances drew the opposite conclusion?

July 24, 2008 10:38 pm
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September 21, 2008 7:06 am

[…] blog and JZ’s book have both taken issue with Steve Jobs’ introduction to the iPhone: We define everything that […]

November 9, 2009 2:33 pm
Dan on paragraph 13:

Well… this is pretty misinformed. While, yes, websites are pulling in content from “hundreds of different sources”, there is a wall between the code that runs these sites and the code that runs your machine… for instance, Mac’s OS X has been without significantly effective viruses for all of its decade of existence.

If this is your only evidence that the “need for stability is growing,” your argument is in trouble.

December 9, 2009 8:57 pm
Rick :

Agree with above. This betrays the author’s lack of experience outside the Windows sphere. Unix systems are not, have never been, and never will be vulnerable the way Windows is. Of course this myopic view of computer security is probably shared with Steve Jobs, wherefore we have arrived at the impasse we’re at today.

July 10, 2010 4:16 pm

[…] Prof. Jonathan Zittrain) than the PC era that came before. It’s frustrating to see Apple, the original pioneer in generative computing, putting shackles on the market it (for now) leads. If Apple wants to be a real leader, it should […]

March 8, 2010 9:42 pm

[…] Prof. Jonathan Zittrain) than the PC era that came before. It’s frustrating to see Apple, the original pioneer in generative computing, putting shackles on the market it (for now) leads. If Apple wants to be a real leader, it should […]

March 9, 2010 5:47 pm

[…] Prof. Jonathan Zittrain) than the PC era that came before. It’s frustrating to see Apple, the original pioneer in generative computing, putting shackles on the market it (for now) leads. If Apple wants to be a real leader, it should […]

March 9, 2010 9:40 pm

[…] of Prof. Jonathan Zittrain) than the PC era that came before. It’s frustrating to see Apple, the original pioneer in generative computing, putting shackles on the market it (for now) leads. If Apple wants to be a real leader, it should […]

March 9, 2010 10:44 pm

[…] Prof. Jonathan Zittrain) than the PC era that came before. It’s frustrating to see Apple, the original pioneer in generative computing, putting shackles on the market it (for now) leads. If Apple wants to be a real leader, it should […]

March 9, 2010 11:59 pm

[…] Prof. Jonathan Zittrain) than the PC era that came before. It’s frustrating to see Apple, the original pioneer in generative computing, putting shackles on the market it (for now) leads. If Apple wants to be a real leader, it should […]

March 10, 2010 3:02 am

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June 5, 2010 11:57 am

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June 6, 2010 10:43 am

[…] Jobs at D8: Post-PC era is nigh. In the introduction of the book, JZ predicted that Steve Jobs, having launched the PC era, was about to usher it out. Now, Jobs says the same […]

June 28, 2010 12:23 pm
Ben on paragraph 13:

“Today’s viruses and spyware are not merely annoyances to be ignored as one might tune out loud conversations at nearby tables in a restaurant. They will not be fixed by some new round of patches to bug-filled PC operating systems, or by abandoning now-ubiquitous Windows for Mac.”

This is just obnoxious. The author is a professor of computer science? O RLY? The author is a farce when it comes to computer science. And such stupid statements at the very beginning of this book totally undermine the confidence of the reader.

July 14, 2010 4:42 pm

[…] mentioned the notion of tinkering and block-box technology in his talk, I immediately thought of Jonathan Zittrain’s concept of sterile and generative technology. Generative technology is open for modification, and it invites users to look inside. Generative […]

October 28, 2010 11:02 pm

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October 30, 2010 5:03 am
Henry Story on paragraph 13:

There is another piece that is missing in here: Java. Note that the Android market share is going up faster that the iPhone and that is running a Java clone and Linux. Java has one very powerful feature that has not been used any where close to enough: the ability to specify very precisely what resources an application can use.
The reason the iPhone has to be so careful about what is allowed on the iphone is because they don’t have the inbuilt protections of Java. So with Java code could be restricted to only writing and reading certain parts of the hard drive….

These features are not used, because people don’t think enough about security. But those things are changing.

November 24, 2010 7:08 pm

[…] discussion of generative PCs and tethered devices including thoughts on JZ’s thesis in the book, as well as a take on his concerns about crowdsourced […]

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March 17, 2012 8:00 am

[…] Future of the Internet – And How to Stop It” (Jonathan Zittrain) lays out some great comparisons between the Apple II and the Apple iPhone and how they were […]

March 18, 2012 7:41 pm

[…] “Introduction” to Zittrain’s book ‘The Future of The Internet And How To Stop It’ writes […]

March 19, 2012 8:07 pm

[…] article hit home for me, as an avid apple user and promoter it made me consider the benefits and fallbacks […]

March 20, 2012 4:57 am

[…] the threat of cyber attacks increase. Apple’s regulations limit this threat, and as Jonathan Zittrain states in this week’s readings “as these problems grow worse, for many the promise of […]

March 20, 2012 6:25 am

[…] as the Apple iPhone and Generative platforms, as seen with the Android platform, where, Zittrain states “as time passes, the brand names on each side will change, but the core battle will […]

March 20, 2012 7:54 am

[…] ok.  I haven’t wrecked it… too much.  Well, maybe they were right.  In his article The Future of the Internet And How to Stop It, Jonathan Zittrain […]

March 20, 2012 8:08 am

[…] extended my ‘online’ time (if indeed we are ever offline) is my Iphone 4s- a gleaming ‘product of fashion and fear’. Now to find that this is a device that is locked, monitored and controlled is disheartening. While […]

March 20, 2012 9:10 am

[…] audience which uses the device, the industry and the capabilities of the particular technology. The second reading helps to confirm the closed platform (in this case, the iPhone) as being a sterile, something that […]

March 20, 2012 3:10 pm

[…] J L 2008, The Future of the Internet and How to Stop It, accessed 20/03/2012, http://yupnet.org/zittrain/archives/6 Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:LikeBe the first to like this […]

March 20, 2012 5:57 pm

[…] Google, with the Iphone and Android phones respectively.  Steve Jobs summed up in the first of the readings, that the Iphone isn’t to be used like a pc and that a user shouldn’t want this for a phone […]

March 20, 2012 5:59 pm

[…] interact with others through them. Both of these ideologies were represented perfectly through the rivalry between iPhone and Android phones. iPhone embodied the conglomerate view that audiences are static, while Android phones support the […]

March 20, 2012 9:20 pm

[…] Zittrain. The Future of the Internet and how to stop it. (p 1-5) New Haven: Yale University Press. http://yupnet.org/zittrain/archives/6 William Gerhardt, Cisco Internet Business Solutions Group, Prosumers: A New Growth Opportunity (p […]

March 21, 2012 7:27 am

[…] abundance of applications. Digital freedom can have  negative consequences as shown in the reading the future of the internet and how to stop it where Jonathan Zittrain talks about viruses, spam, delays  and crashes. So really, is this freedom […]

March 21, 2012 7:29 am

[…] Zittrain. The Future of the Internet and how to stop it. (p 1-5) New Haven: Yale University Press. http://yupnet.org/zittrain/archives/6 William Gerhardt, Cisco Internet Business Solutions Group, Prosumers: A New Growth Opportunity (p […]

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March 21, 2012 9:59 am

[…] threats such as identity theft and crashes, are constant risks taken when using an open appliance (Zittrain, 2006). Are we willing to take this risk in order to use this form of technology or should we opt for the […]

March 21, 2012 6:17 pm
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March 22, 2012 4:31 pm

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March 22, 2012 5:56 pm

[…] The late Steve Jobs was completely candid about Apple’s control over the device at the launch of the first iPhone in 2007, saying that Apple “define everything that is on the phone” and “the last thing you want is to have loaded three apps on your phone and then you go to make a call and it doesn’t work anymore”. (http://yupnet.org/zittrain/archives/6) […]

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March 24, 2012 8:19 pm

[…] John Zittrain’s “The Future of the Internet and how to Stop it,” Zittrain describes his preference for locked appliances where it prevents the threat of […]

March 25, 2012 2:59 am

[…] distinguishes the role of a particular technology in relation to individuals and creators. In his article, Zittrain identifies the underlying ideologies found through the design of technological platforms […]

March 25, 2012 6:35 am

[…] This change in the way we access the internet, as a result of developing smartphone technology has inevitable consequences for the future.  […]

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March 26, 2012 2:58 am

[…] lack of sense I found even further exacerbated by one of the readings for this week. Jobs once openly embraced generative technology with the Apple II. The only real […]

March 26, 2012 5:28 am

[…] including the audience is positive in sharing opinions but many disagree, particularly Apple’s Steve Jobs who had fears that consumers would then change the intention of his creation of the locked […]

March 28, 2012 4:29 am

[…] up on Jonathan Zittrain and Clay Shirky articles and readings before yesterday’s lecture made it a lot easier for me to […]

March 29, 2012 8:52 am

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[…] The ideologies of locked appliances and generative platforms sets the parameters for engagement. “The PC can run code from anywhere, written by anyone…The information appliance remains … The main focus here is control over use. Access permissions on devices are ideological choices. […]

March 25, 2013 7:51 pm

[…] apps on your phone and then you go to make a call and it doesn’t work anymore.” (quoted in Zittrain […]

March 26, 2013 12:20 am

[…] responsibility to make free choices (open appliance). Jonathan L. Zittrain in the reading this week “The future of the internet and how to stop it” clearly reminds us that with the freedom of choice, can come with “viruses, scams, identity […]

March 26, 2013 2:40 am

[…] The Future of the Internet and How to Stop It was a simple read that had a good amount of information. It was discussing the topic of open and closed systems. Interpreting it, I found that it gave positives and negatives for both operating systems. Both systems have excellent positives and large negatives. My platform that I am discussing via my Twitter is looking at the “Smartphone” so this week’s lecture was really interesting to me. Recently, my Samsung Galaxy Ace had a little water damage by no fault of my own… and they expected me to pay for the repairs (the nerve!), so my friend offered me his iPhone for free and I gladly took it. I do not like how the iPhone works at all, I have discovered, and that it does not give me as much freedom as my android phone did. Many people I have talked to also say that they do not like their iPhone, with a friend’s mother getting rid of her iPhone 5 within the first few weeks. It really depends on what the user wants, but open systems generally seem better for the user and for creativity. It generates new options, and can better the system without the tunnel vision of one company. This reading explains how Steve Jobs believed the public needed to be told what they wanted. This appears to be true for most of the population of the world, as people lined up waiting for the new iPhone. […]

March 26, 2013 6:10 am

[…] can change themes and interact more with the phone, however as Jonathan Zittrain states in ‘The Future of the Internet and How to Stop it’,  “The iPhone is the opposite. It is sterile. Rather than a platform that invites innovation, […]

March 27, 2013 7:17 am

[…] - Zittrain, J (2008) “Introduction.” In J.Zittrain ‘The Future of the Internet And How to Stop it’ to read the full article click here […]

March 27, 2013 11:30 pm

[…] epitome of smart phones. It is characterised by its closed function, pre-programmed capabilities, “you are not allowed to add programs to the all-in-one device.” With its manageable and static nature, this phone is ideal for people who are unfamiliar with smart […]

March 28, 2013 3:17 am

[…] to be reinstalled.  Why? Steve Jobs held that intention. At the 2007 iPhone launch, he stated “You don’t want your phone to be like a PC. The last thing you want is to have loaded three …(cited in Zittrain, J 2008) Apple devices thus become part of one collective entity, where a wide […]

March 28, 2013 6:22 am

[…] felt that this week’s lecture and one of the readings in particular, ‘The Future of The Internet…’ by Jonathan Zittrain were quite revolutionary in my eyes for understanding the convergent media world. I developed a […]

March 28, 2013 6:09 pm

[…] We are living in a world that thrives on technology, and with new media platforms emerging constantly, we need to be aware of how convergence will affect these new technologies and platforms. According to Henry Jenkins in ‘The Cultural Logic of Media Convergence’, he believes that ‘Media convergence is more than simply a technological shift. Convergence alters the relationship between existing technologies, industries, markets, genres and audience’. An example of media convergence is the iPhone. It is not only just a phone, it also allows us to listen to music, call and text, store photos, browse the internet, play games and navigate us to destinations. We can see how this phone is pushing the industry to a new level of competition in ways to connect us to each other and to the Web (Zittrain, 2008, pg.1). […]

March 28, 2013 6:19 pm

[…] is put on a particular platform, for example Apple products. Steve Jobs stated that they “define everything” that is on the iPhone including apps and features. Apple wants to control the use of their […]

March 29, 2013 3:33 am

[…] realised – is that Apple controls everything. The iPhone, for example, is a closed appliance. As Jonathan L. Zittrain said in an article, the iPhone is ‘sterile’ and ‘doesn&#82… I have to wonder how much more successful (if that is even possible) the iPhone would be if it […]

March 29, 2013 7:00 am

[…] quote from Jonathan L. Zittrain’s introduction to The Future of The Internet And How to Stop It is the problem with free flowing digital content. This was probably what Jobs was thinking when he […]

March 31, 2013 2:06 am

[…] The Future of the Internet and How to Stop It- (Zittrain, J. 2008) Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… This entry was posted in BCM112, […]

March 31, 2013 10:17 pm

[…] his book The Future of the Internet and How to Stop It, Jonathan Zittrain, a Harvard Law School professor, describes the PC as a generative platform that […]

April 1, 2013 8:48 am

[…] Internet. “The future is not one of generative PCs attached to a generative network,” the book warns; “it is instead one of sterile appliances tethered to a network of control.” In response to the […]

April 1, 2013 5:00 pm

[…] MacBook provide security from viruses, spam and crashes as they are so closely controlled by Apple (http://yupnet.org/zittrain/archives/6). However on the other hand, generative, open platforms such as Android allow for anyone to […]

April 1, 2013 7:45 pm

[…] The apple II and the Iphone are fundamentally different products. The apple II, one of the first highly successful mass-produced microcomputer products, was introduced by Steve Jobs in 1977. It was quintessentially a generative technology. It invited people to tinker with it, write their own code and program it any way they wanted. This made it a PC. Jobs and Apple had no idea about how the computer would be used. “The Iphone is the opposite. It is sterile. Rather than a platform that invites innovation, the iPhone comes programmed”. (J. Zittrain) […]

April 1, 2013 9:02 pm

[…] “We define everything that is on the phone. . . . You don’t want your phone to be like a PC. The last thing you want is to have loaded three apps on your phone and then you go to make a call and it doesn’t work anymore.” – Steve Jobs […]

April 1, 2013 11:09 pm

[…] to explain what I’m talking about here. Apple provides its customers with closed appliances; as J.Zittrain states, ”rather than a platform that invites innovation, the iPhone comes preprogrammed. You […]

April 1, 2013 11:36 pm

[…] devices such as viruses, spam and crashes, the iPhone offered a safety net, as discussed in “The Future of the Internet and How to Stop It”. But with the inability to fully adjust the iPhone for user preference, the device was seen by some […]

April 1, 2013 11:37 pm

[…] strongly disagrees with this way of running things. Steve Jobs stated that “You don’t want your phone to be like a PC. The last thing you want is to have loaded three apps… This puts Apple devices in its own separate being, with their own stores such as the App Store. […]

April 2, 2013 1:34 am

[…] from this personal preference, as argued by Johnathon Zittrain in ‘The Future of the Internet and how to stop it’, “The future is not one of generative PCs attached to a generative network. It is instead one […]

April 2, 2013 4:22 am

[…] of the ideology of locked appliances vs. generative platforms  and behind both options is control. Jonathan Zittrain explains the ideology well, “offering a more consistent and focused user experience at the […]

April 2, 2013 6:08 am

[…] shops to the Internet, friends, music, games and more. However if you explore this notion of locked v generative (a.k.a open) appliances one form may stand out from the […]

April 2, 2013 7:08 pm

[…] We have the iPhone a locked appliance a software system that has complete control over the platform the content and the user. You as a user are not permitted to alter anything, to but it bluntly… you get what you’re given! “We define everything that is on the phone. . . . You don’t want your phone to be like a PC. The last thing you want is to have loaded three apps on your phone and then you go to make a call and it doesn’t work anymore.” - Steve Jobs […]

April 2, 2013 10:01 pm

[…] me to the case of closed appliances versus generative platforms, which can be further explain in Jonathan L. Zittrains ‘THE FUTURE OF THE INTERNET AND HOW TO STOP IT’. So the Apple iPhone is a closed appliance, in that apple completely controls the phones […]

April 2, 2013 10:03 pm

[…] reference to Jonathan Zittrains article, Posse is probably a more closed platform than open, in the sense that the creators of the website […]

April 3, 2013 4:23 am

[…] is a locked appliance that thrives on owner empowerment. However, Zittrain (2008) explains this was not the case with Steve Jobs first invention Apple II, with its […]

April 3, 2013 5:43 am

[…] the control lies with Apple the company, users cannot add and adjust programs themselves. Zittrain (2008) reinforces this by stating that “ the iPhone comes preprogrammed. You are not allowed to […]

April 4, 2013 7:27 am

[…] Zittrain in ‘The Future of the Internet and How to stop it’ highlights how Apple was once very similar to the open nature of Android. The Apple II, introduced […]

April 4, 2013 8:24 am

[…] represent, some to the extent that it is almost a utopian view. There are some downsides though, as Zittrain (2008 para. 8) discusses some very ‘uncool stuff’ can come with that freedom (viruses, spam, […]

April 4, 2013 5:23 pm

[…] claims its locked appliance is a crucial characteristic of consumption, as it removes dilemmas of “Viruses, spam, identity theft, crashes: all of these were the consequences of a certain freedom”. Countering this opinion is the Android platform, which affirms superiority as it is designed to […]

April 4, 2013 5:35 pm

[…] Zittrain J. (2008) “Introduction”. In J. Zittrain The Future of The Internet And How To … […]

April 4, 2013 11:08 pm

[…] me define what makes a closed, locked device and what makes an open, generative platform. As Zittrain explained a locked device is one that is tethered one way to be functionally locked in; they are […]

April 5, 2013 12:59 am

[…] consumers. Phones have allowed everyone to be their own critic, dj and photographer not only this simple mobile phone has now allowed the user to become a news reporter. Documenting an event and publishing it on media sites allows the audience to see another perspective […]

April 5, 2013 2:14 pm

[…] also a fundamental clash between locked v/s open, as stated in one of our readings from the book Future of the internet and how to stop it he goes into specific details about this being a threat to the future of the internet. He puts a […]

April 5, 2013 2:31 pm

[…] found what the late Steve Jobs said “You don’t want your phone to be like a PC. The last thing you want is to have loaded three apps…, was a contradiction what was going to happen in a few years’ time like, the increasing  storage […]

April 10, 2013 10:19 am
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April 11, 2013 7:04 am
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